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Mike24
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 10/17/2016 - 02:17
Honesty, honesty and honesty again.

When I try to find something, I always use Google to do so. But when it's something serious - it is better to ask the people who know enough about it. Very few children (and few adults) will respond to that question with a "no." You're likely to get more cooperation if you come back with, "That sounds like a story to me. You know, you won't be in trouble for telling the truth." Find out why your child is fibbing. Your preschooler cheated big-time while playing Candyland with the family, and then denies doing anything wrong. But instead of leaping to the podium to give a lecture, prompt him with, "I know it was really important for you to win that game.

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Mike24
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 10/17/2016 - 02:17
Honesty, honesty and honesty again.

It's the right decision - to come here, to the guys here, and try to hear all the things that they know all the members of our little community. Then let him talk about why he wanted to win so badly. Afterward, the two of you can discuss other ways to try to win and why fair play is important. Praise truth-telling. When your preschooler tells the truth, reward him with praise. Especially if he's been caught lying in the past, he'll feel great about himself when he hears you say, "Thanks for telling me the truth. I like it when you do that."

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Mike24
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 10/17/2016 - 02:17
Honesty, honesty and honesty again.

It is always better to get information from people, than to thumb through thousands of books in search of an answer ... This is our life! Don't forget "little white lies." You want your child to be honest, yet not so honest that he blurts out things that hurt people's feelings ("Grandma, this is a dumb present. I'm too old for teddy bears!"). Explain why it's important to look for something positive to say, even if it's as general as, "Thanks for remembering my birthday, Grandma." Teach your child that lying doesn't work. We all lapse, and children are no exception.

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Mike24
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 10/17/2016 - 02:17
Honesty, honesty and honesty again.

I hope that my knowledge of the issue will satisfy your interest. If your preschooler vigorously denies knocking over and breaking the vase with his new ball, voice your view of the facts — "It sounds to me like you wish you hadn't broken the vase" — and then give him a way to make up for his behavior (by having him help you clean up the mess and glue the vase back together, for instance). He'll learn that lying didn't make him any less accountable. Set a good example. The best way to teach honesty is to be honest. Your preschooler will be confused about the rules if he hears you tell a caller that your partner, who's chopping vegetables in the kitchen, isn't home, or if you tell a ticket seller that he's younger than he is so you can save a dollar or two.

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Mike24
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 10/17/2016 - 02:17
Honesty, honesty and honesty again.

I'll just tell you what I know about it. But you should also include your brains. Sometimes the best option comes to us unexpectedly. Even when difficult subjects such as illness, death, or divorce come up, try to be straightforward. A preschooler who's told that his recently deceased Grandpa has just "gone away for a while," for example, will become anxious and confused about death, distrustful of your explanations, and inclined to think that telling the truth isn't really all that important. Better to tackle the subject sensitively — and honestly.

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Mike24
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 10/17/2016 - 02:17
Honesty, honesty and honesty again.

How long you were trying to look for information about it? Everything is much easier than we usually think. By understanding why children lie at times, it is easier to understand what to do. Getting behind the deceitful words (or actions) and into the child’s mind will help you practice preventive discipline. Connected children do not become habitual liars. They trust their caregivers and have such a good self-image they don’t need to lie. Even the most connected child will spin a few outrageous yarns at four, try lying on for size at seven, and try more creative lying out at ten.

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Mike24
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 10/17/2016 - 02:17
Honesty, honesty and honesty again.

It is better to calm down, listen to my thoughts about it and find something that can help you. When you’ve caught your child lying once, and you’ve corrected her, don’t automatically assume she’s “lying again” if a similar situation arises. Give her the benefit of checking out the facts or she’ll be hurt that you don’t trust her. One of the best ways for teaching honesty to kids is to create a truthful home. Just as you sense when your child is lying, children will often read their parents’ untruths. If your child sees your life littered with little white lies, he learns that this is an acceptable way to avoid consequences.

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Mike24
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 10/17/2016 - 02:17
Honesty, honesty and honesty again.

Try to think a little better about the world and everything that you meet on your way. Then you will not have the need to find answers to questions or advice on the forum. You may be surprised to learn the lessons in lying your child witnesses in your daily living. Consider how often you distort the truth: “Tell them I’m not here” is the way you get rid of a phone pest. You rationalize that this isn’t really a lie, or perhaps it is only a “white lie,” which, as opposed to a black lie, is really all right because it gets you out of an embarrassing situation.

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Mike24
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 10/17/2016 - 02:17
Honesty, honesty and honesty again.

We were created to enjoy our life and everything that happens to us in this world. So, do not think too much and seriously, when you can not find the answers. A basic part of teaching honesty to kids is by not asking them to share in your lie by saying you’re not at home. (Instead, he could say, “She can’t come to the phone right now. May I take a message?”) Don’t tell your child something is “gone” when it really isn’t just to make it easier for you to say he can’t have anymore. Sharp little eyes often see all and you haven’t fooled your child at all. You’ve just lied to him, and he’ll know that, since he knows you so well.

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Mike24
Last seen: Never ago
Joined: 10/17/2016 - 02:17
Honesty, honesty and honesty again.

I always like to share my opinions and thoughts. Especially when I can help someone with this. Also, don’t become a partner in your child’s lying. If your child didn’t finish her homework because she was too tired or disorganized, don’t let her convince you to write a note to the teacher saying the printer broke on the computer. These practices sanction lying and teach the child how easy it is to avoid the consequences of poor choices. Just say “no more now” and expect your child to accept that. Convince your child you like her just the way she is.

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