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Don Adriano
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How to Discuss Sex with Your Child

She can tell you about it without having you get embarrassed or weepy on her. You might want to start this conversation off (or simply let her know that you're willing to have it whenever she wants) with a casual question or remark: "Do you know if any of the older girls at school have started their periods yet?" Or: "You know, when I was your age, I didn't understand about periods and I felt too embarrassed to ask anybody." Another useful approach for a child who's reached the age of 10 or so is to give her a good, readable kids' book on puberty and sexual development. Before buying, look it over yourself to make sure you like its approach.

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Don Adriano
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Joined: 10/17/2016 - 01:52
How to Discuss Sex with Your Child

Then put the book in your child's room, where she can look at in private, and casually tell her that you've left it there for her to look at if she wants to. You can be sure the book will be read, and it may ease her fears and help her feel more comfortable about talking to you about sexual issues and feelings. One excellent series is the What's Happening to My Body? books -- one for girls and one for boys -- by Lynda Madaras. Another invaluable guide for girls is The Period Book (Everything You Don't Want to Ask But Need to Know) written by Karen Gravelle in consultation with her 15-year-old niece, Jennifer.

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Don Adriano
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How to Discuss Sex with Your Child

Positive and practical, it covers tampons, pads, pimples, mood swings, and all of the other things girls wonder and worry about as they learn to deal with their menstrual cycles. Boys may notice the erections of other boys (even babies), wonder about their own erections and physical responses, and hear "boner" jokes or other crude references as early as first grade. So it's a good idea to explain erections even to very young boys in a low-key way, making sure they understand that there's nothing shameful about a natural body response that they often have no control over.

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Don Adriano
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Joined: 10/17/2016 - 01:52
How to Discuss Sex with Your Child

This should be easier if you've used the correct terms for body parts from the beginning; if you haven't, start getting your child comfortable with saying "penis" and easing him away from the euphemistic terms he's used until now. Boys begin to have wet dreams when they reach puberty, usually between the ages of 9 and 15. A boy's first ejaculation may occur during a wet dream, and when he wakes up, he may not realize what happened. Thus it's important to let your son know well before puberty that wet dreams are a normal part of growing up and nothing to be ashamed of, that he can't control them, and that ejaculation is just a physical sign that he's growing into manhood.

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Don Adriano
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Joined: 10/17/2016 - 01:52
How to Discuss Sex with Your Child

Talking about masturbation is embarrassing for both you and your child, but it's important to let her know that there's nothing shameful or abnormal about sexually stimulating herself. By this age, your child should be long past touching herself in public, but both boys and girls may continue to masturbate in private, some of them quite often. Your child may feel guilty about this unless you reassure her that it's not only normal but healthy to have sexual feelings, and that everyone masturbates, though they may not talk about it. It is important!

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Don Adriano
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Joined: 10/17/2016 - 01:52
How to Discuss Sex with Your Child

By being as inquisitive as you can, without tipping off your child that you're snooping -- at this age, kids absolutely don't want to feel that their parents are looking over their shoulder. At school, ask the teachers exactly what they're teaching at each grade level. (When and how do they discuss the reproductive system, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual harassment, and so on?) If they use textbooks or handouts, read them yourself. You probably worry about what comes at your child on the Internet, but watch her television shows, too.

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Don Adriano
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How to Discuss Sex with Your Child

Pick up the magazines she's looking at. Be aware of what registers at her eye level on magazine stands, particularly the ones that hold adults-only publications. If you can stand it, listen to your child's favorite radio stations for a while. You'll probably see that from school age on, kids are inundated with sexual references -- most of them sniggering, disrespectful, or misleading. The more you know about what your child is seeing and hearing about sex from other sources, the better equipped you are to make sure she knows what you want to tell her.

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Don Adriano
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Joined: 10/17/2016 - 01:52
How to Discuss Sex with Your Child

Unfortunately, she probably does. She's likely to be hearing or reading references to AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases in the news and from her schoolmates; if you live in an urban area, she'll notice all the billboards and ads on the sides of buses invoking the importance of "safe sex." You might as well make sure she's getting information that's accurate and no more scary than it has to be. And answering her questions matter-of-factly is one more way of reassuring her that she can trust you to discuss sex calmly with her.

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Don Adriano
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How to Discuss Sex with Your Child

Do I have to explain oral sex to my child when she's this young? If she's 6-years-old, no. But by the time kids are in fifth or sixth grade, "blow job" has likely become part of their vocabulary -- we can thank the latest round of popular gross-out movies for that. So you'd be wise to prepare yourself for a question or conversation about oral sex, especially since it continues to be a fascinating and perplexing subject for kids in middle and high school. It's not too early to start talking to your child about the important connections among sex, love, and responsibility.

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Fabio
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How to Discuss Sex with Your Child

I think that you don't need to express the physiological aspect of it. You should explain to your child that sex is an aspect of love, when two loving people grow up and decide to be together as a family, they express their love in some special way. Of course, the child wi;ll want to know more, because all parts of adult life which are unknown seem attractive and curios. Tell your child that his or her time will come, that there is a special person for him or her to become closer physically and mentally, to have kids as a continuation of your love.

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